Fix `Failed To Fetch` Google Chrome Repository After Google Dropped Support For Its Browser On Linux 32bit

As announced back in December, Google stopped supporting Google Chrome on 32-bit Linux starting this month. Users running a 32bit Linux distribution are advised to stop using Google Chrome because, while it will continue to work, it will no longer receive any updates (including no security fixes).
The 32-bit build configurations for Chromium continues to be supported, so you can still use Chromium browser on 32-bit Linux distributions.

Because the official Google Chrome repository no longer provides 32-bit packages, 64-bit Ubuntu/Debian users will notice an error when updating the software sources, which looks as follows:

Failed to fetch http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/dists/stable/Release 
Unable to find expected entry 'main/binary-i386/Packages' in Release file (Wrong sources.list entry or malformed file) 
Some index files failed to download. They have been ignored, or old ones used instead.

To fix this error on Ubuntu/Debian 64-bit, the repository must be specifically set for 64-bit only – this can be done by adding “[arch=amd64]” after “deb” in the /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list and /opt/google/chrome/cron/google-chrome files. To do this automatically, you can use the following commands:

sudo sed -i -e 's/deb http/deb [arch=amd64] http/' "/etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list"
sudo sed -i -e 's/deb http/deb [arch=amd64] http/' "/opt/google/chrome/cron/google-chrome"

(Update: The article was modified with the addition of a second command that adds “[arch=amd64]” to the script that generates the .list file – thanks to +Adam Gunklach)

On 32-bit, you should remove the repository and stop using Google Chrome since it won’t receive any security updates:
sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list
sudo apt-get remove google-chrome

thanks to darkfur93 @ reddit for the info (and to Bruce Ingalls for the tip)

Fix `Failed To Fetch` Google Chrome Repository After Google Dropped Support For Its Browser On Linux 32bit

As announced back in December, Google stopped supporting Google Chrome on 32-bit Linux starting this month. Users running a 32bit Linux distribution are advised to stop using Google Chrome because, while it will continue to work, it will no longer receive any updates (including no security fixes).
The 32-bit build configurations for Chromium continues to be supported, so you can still use Chromium browser on 32-bit Linux distributions.

Because the official Google Chrome repository no longer provides 32-bit packages, 64-bit Ubuntu/Debian users will notice an error when updating the software sources, which looks as follows:

Failed to fetch http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/dists/stable/Release 
Unable to find expected entry 'main/binary-i386/Packages' in Release file (Wrong sources.list entry or malformed file) 
Some index files failed to download. They have been ignored, or old ones used instead.

To fix this error on Ubuntu/Debian 64-bit, the repository must be specifically set for 64-bit only – this can be done by adding “[arch=amd64]” after “deb” in the /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list and /opt/google/chrome/cron/google-chrome files. To do this automatically, you can use the following commands:

sudo sed -i -e 's/deb http/deb [arch=amd64] http/' "/etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list"
sudo sed -i -e 's/deb http/deb [arch=amd64] http/' "/opt/google/chrome/cron/google-chrome"

(Update: The article was modified with the addition of a second command that adds “[arch=amd64]” to the script that generates the .list file – thanks to +Adam Gunklach)

On 32-bit, you should remove the repository and stop using Google Chrome since it won’t receive any security updates:
sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list
sudo apt-get remove google-chrome

thanks to darkfur93 @ reddit for the info (and to Bruce Ingalls for the tip)

Fitbit Charge HR Wireless Activity Wristband for $100 + free shipping

Blutek via eBay offers the Fitbit Charge HR Wireless Activity Wristband in Black, model no. FB405, for $99.99 with free shipping. That’s tied with our expired mention from four days ago and the lowest total price we could find by $19. Features include continuous heart rate monitoring, step-, distance-, sleep-, and calorie-tracking, time and date display, and wireless sync with supported computers and smartphones. It’s available in Large only.

Fitbit Charge HR Wireless Activity Wristband for $100 + free shipping

Blutek via eBay offers the Fitbit Charge HR Wireless Activity Wristband in Black, model no. FB405, for $99.99 with free shipping. That’s tied with our expired mention from four days ago and the lowest total price we could find by $19. Features include continuous heart rate monitoring, step-, distance-, sleep-, and calorie-tracking, time and date display, and wireless sync with supported computers and smartphones. It’s available in Large only.

Encrypt Your Cloud Files With Cryptomator (Open Source, Cross-Platform)

Cryptomator is a free and open source client-side encryption solution for your cloud files, available for Linux, Windows and Mac OS X, as well as iOS. An Android app is currently under development.

Cryptomator is advertised as being especially developed to encrypt your cloud files from services such as Dropbox, Google Drive, Mega and other cloud storage services that synchronize with a local directory. 
Since the encryption is done on the client side, it means that no unencrypted data is shared with any online service.
Furthermore, you can use Cryptomator to create as many vaults as you want, each having individual passwords.
For the encryption, Cryptomator uses AES with 256-bit keys. For an extra layer of security, directory structures, filenames and file sizes get obfuscated, while the passphrase you set for encryption is protected against bruteforce attempts using Scrypt. The Cryptomator security architecture page has more information regarding its encryption / privacy.
I should also mention that Cryptomator uses WebDAV to mount the vaults and this causes some issues on Linux, like not being able to open LibreOffice files directly from the unlocked vault (although this didn’t occur in my test under Ubuntu 16.04) – bug report. In the future, Cryptomator may switch to FUSE on Linux and OS X to avoid such issues.

How to use Cryptomator

Let’s create your first vault using Cryptomator. Launch the application and click “+” to add a new vault, then browse the location where you want to create it.
For instance, if you want to create a folder called “Encrypted” in your Dropbox directory, select the Dropbox directory and enter “Encrypted” as the vault name, then click “Save”:

Then enter a password for the newly created vault and click “Create vault”:

That’s it!

Now to copy some files in your vault, you’ll need to unlock it, so enter your password and click “Unlock vault”:

After clicking “Unlock vault”, your unlocked vault (which is mounted via WebDAV) should open in the default file manager:

Any files you copy here are synchronized as encrypted with Dropbox (or whatever other cloud storage service you use).
Note that you can’t close Cryptomator while a vault is unlocked. If you try to close the application while a vault is unlocked, the app is minimized. To be able to close the application you need to re-lock the vault, by clicking “Lock vault”.

Download Cryptomator

(binaries: 64bit only deb for Ubuntu / Debian, Windows and Mac OS X as well as a generic JAR executable)

Note that if you use the JAR file, you’ll need to install JRE 8 and the JCE unlimited strength policy files. That’s not required if you install the deb, because both JRE8 and the JCE unlimited strength policy files are bundled with the deb.
Arch Linux users can install Cryptomator via AUR.
Cryptomator is also available for iOS. An Android app is in development.

via Reddit

Encrypt Your Cloud Files With Cryptomator (Open Source, Cross-Platform)

Cryptomator is a free and open source client-side encryption solution for your cloud files, available for Linux, Windows and Mac OS X, as well as iOS. An Android app is currently under development.

Cryptomator is advertised as being especially developed to encrypt your cloud files from services such as Dropbox, Google Drive, Mega and other cloud storage services that synchronize with a local directory. 
Since the encryption is done on the client side, it means that no unencrypted data is shared with any online service.
Furthermore, you can use Cryptomator to create as many vaults as you want, each having individual passwords.
For the encryption, Cryptomator uses AES with 256-bit keys. For an extra layer of security, directory structures, filenames and file sizes get obfuscated, while the passphrase you set for encryption is protected against bruteforce attempts using Scrypt. The Cryptomator security architecture page has more information regarding its encryption / privacy.
I should also mention that Cryptomator uses WebDAV to mount the vaults and this causes some issues on Linux, like not being able to open LibreOffice files directly from the unlocked vault (although this didn’t occur in my test under Ubuntu 16.04) – bug report. In the future, Cryptomator may switch to FUSE on Linux and OS X to avoid such issues.

How to use Cryptomator

Let’s create your first vault using Cryptomator. Launch the application and click “+” to add a new vault, then browse the location where you want to create it.
For instance, if you want to create a folder called “Encrypted” in your Dropbox directory, select the Dropbox directory and enter “Encrypted” as the vault name, then click “Save”:

Then enter a password for the newly created vault and click “Create vault”:

That’s it!

Now to copy some files in your vault, you’ll need to unlock it, so enter your password and click “Unlock vault”:

After clicking “Unlock vault”, your unlocked vault (which is mounted via WebDAV) should open in the default file manager:

Any files you copy here are synchronized as encrypted with Dropbox (or whatever other cloud storage service you use).
Note that you can’t close Cryptomator while a vault is unlocked. If you try to close the application while a vault is unlocked, the app is minimized. To be able to close the application you need to re-lock the vault, by clicking “Lock vault”.

Download Cryptomator

(binaries: 64bit only deb for Ubuntu / Debian, Windows and Mac OS X as well as a generic JAR executable)

Note that if you use the JAR file, you’ll need to install JRE 8 and the JCE unlimited strength policy files. That’s not required if you install the deb, because both JRE8 and the JCE unlimited strength policy files are bundled with the deb.
Arch Linux users can install Cryptomator via AUR.
Cryptomator is also available for iOS. An Android app is in development.

via Reddit

Easily Create Your Own Numix-Based GTK Themes With Oomox

Oomox is a tool used to generate various color variations of the popular Numix GTK 2/3 theme.

Oomox

The tool features built-in presets, but it also allows changing theme colors individually, and it can even generate random themes. The themes generated using Oomox support GTK3, GTK2 and include Openbox and Xfwm4 themes.
Also, the latest Oomox 0.15, released a few days ago, includes initial support for Unity. What’s not included yet is the ability to change the Unity theme image colors and as a result, the window buttons color used by themes generated using Oomox won’t change in Unity (so the default Numix color will be used for this).

Oomox Numix
Monovedek Oomox preset (Unity / Ubuntu 16.04)

Note that Numix theme requires GTK 3.16 or newer, so the themes generated with Oomox require the same version.
As far as Ubuntu is concerned, Ubuntu GNOME, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Lubuntu and Ubuntu (with Unity) are supported. Since it requires GTK 3.16 or newer, than means you need to be using an Ubuntu 15.10 or 16.04 flavor for the themes to work.

An easier way to change theme colors would be GTK Theme Preferences but unfortunately, this tool no longer works with some themes. For instance, in Ubuntu 16.04, GTK Theme Preferences can change both GTK2 and GTK3 theme colors for Ambiance and Radiance themes, but it doesn’t work with the Numix GTK3 theme.

Here are a few more screenshots featuring themes generated using Oomox:

Oomox Numix
Oomox Retro/Excelsior preset

Oomox Numix
Oomox GNOME Noble preset

Oomox Numix
Oomox Monovedek preset

Oomox Numix
Oomox Tizix Dark preset

Oomox Numix
Oomox Retro/Next preset (Ubuntu GNOME 15.10)

Oomox Numix
Oomox GNOME Noble preset (Ubuntu 16.04 / Unity)

Oomox Numix
Oomox GNOME Noble Dark preset (Ubuntu GNOME 16.04)

Download and use Oomox

Arch Linux users can install Oomox via AUR.

1. Install the required dependencies

Oomox requires python3-gobject as well as the following executables: glib-compile-schemas, gdk-pixbuf-pixdata and sass, while Numix theme requires the Murrine GTK2 engine. xorg-xrdb and xmllint are optional.

Install them in Ubuntu 15.10 or 16.04 using the following command:

sudo apt install python3-gi libglib2.0-bin libgdk-pixbuf2.0-dev ruby-sass libxml2-utils x11-xserver-utils gir1.2-gtk-3.0 gir1.2-glib-2.0 gtk2-engines-murrine

2. Download and install Oomox

You can download Oomox from HERE.

To download Oomox and install it into /opt/oomox/, you can use the following commands:
sudo apt install wget
cd /tmp wget https://github.com/actionless/oomox/archive/0.15.1.tar.gz tar -xvf 0.15.1.tar.gz sudo mkdir /opt/oomox sudo cp -r oomox-0.15.1/* /opt/oomox/

That’s it.

To run the Oomox GUI, use the following command:

/opt/oomox/gui.sh

Using Oomox is very simple – select the preset you want to use (and optionally change the colors if you want to make your own custom Numix theme) and click “Export theme”:

After the theme is generated, it should be available in the ~/.themes folder. You can use a tool like Unity Tweak Tool, GNOME Tweak Tool and so on to change the theme.

Report any bugs related to the generated themes to the Oomox GitHub page. If you think the bugs are Numix theme-related, report them to the Numix GTK Theme GitHub page.

Easily Create Your Own Numix-Based GTK Themes With Oomox

Oomox is a tool used to generate various color variations of the popular Numix GTK 2/3 theme.

Oomox

The tool features built-in presets, but it also allows changing theme colors individually, and it can even generate random themes. The themes generated using Oomox support GTK3, GTK2 and include Openbox and Xfwm4 themes.
Also, the latest Oomox 0.15, released a few days ago, includes initial support for Unity. What’s not included yet is the ability to change the Unity theme image colors and as a result, the window buttons color used by themes generated using Oomox won’t change in Unity (so the default Numix color will be used for this).

Oomox Numix
Monovedek Oomox preset (Unity / Ubuntu 16.04)

Note that Numix theme requires GTK 3.16 or newer, so the themes generated with Oomox require the same version.
As far as Ubuntu is concerned, Ubuntu GNOME, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Lubuntu and Ubuntu (with Unity) are supported. Since it requires GTK 3.16 or newer, than means you need to be using an Ubuntu 15.10 or 16.04 flavor for the themes to work.

An easier way to change theme colors would be GTK Theme Preferences but unfortunately, this tool no longer works with some themes. For instance, in Ubuntu 16.04, GTK Theme Preferences can change both GTK2 and GTK3 theme colors for Ambiance and Radiance themes, but it doesn’t work with the Numix GTK3 theme.

Here are a few more screenshots featuring themes generated using Oomox:

Oomox Numix
Oomox Retro/Excelsior preset

Oomox Numix
Oomox GNOME Noble preset

Oomox Numix
Oomox Monovedek preset

Oomox Numix
Oomox Tizix Dark preset

Oomox Numix
Oomox Retro/Next preset (Ubuntu GNOME 15.10)

Oomox Numix
Oomox GNOME Noble preset (Ubuntu 16.04 / Unity)

Oomox Numix
Oomox GNOME Noble Dark preset (Ubuntu GNOME 16.04)

Download and use Oomox

Arch Linux users can install Oomox via AUR.

1. Install the required dependencies

Oomox requires python3-gobject as well as the following executables: glib-compile-schemas, gdk-pixbuf-pixdata and sass, while Numix theme requires the Murrine GTK2 engine. xorg-xrdb and xmllint are optional.

Install them in Ubuntu 15.10 or 16.04 using the following command:

sudo apt install python3-gi libglib2.0-bin libgdk-pixbuf2.0-dev ruby-sass libxml2-utils x11-xserver-utils gir1.2-gtk-3.0 gir1.2-glib-2.0 gtk2-engines-murrine

2. Download and install Oomox

You can download Oomox from HERE.

To download Oomox and install it into /opt/oomox/, you can use the following commands:
sudo apt install wget
cd /tmp wget https://github.com/actionless/oomox/archive/0.15.1.tar.gz tar -xvf 0.15.1.tar.gz sudo mkdir /opt/oomox sudo cp -r oomox-0.15.1/* /opt/oomox/

That’s it.

To run the Oomox GUI, use the following command:

/opt/oomox/gui.sh

Using Oomox is very simple – select the preset you want to use (and optionally change the colors if you want to make your own custom Numix theme) and click “Export theme”:

After the theme is generated, it should be available in the ~/.themes folder. You can use a tool like Unity Tweak Tool, GNOME Tweak Tool and so on to change the theme.

Report any bugs related to the generated themes to the Oomox GitHub page. If you think the bugs are Numix theme-related, report them to the Numix GTK Theme GitHub page.

Michael Kors Watches at Last Call: 35% off + $25 off + free shipping

Last Call takes up to 35% off select Michael Kors men’s and women’s watches. Plus, cut an extra $25 off via coupon code “TAKE25”, with prices starting from $134.25 after discount. Even better, all orders receive free shipping via stacking coupon code “LCSHIP”. Deal ends May 18.

Michael Kors Watches at Last Call: 35% off + $25 off + free shipping

Last Call takes up to 35% off select Michael Kors men’s and women’s watches. Plus, cut an extra $25 off via coupon code “TAKE25”, with prices starting from $134.25 after discount. Even better, all orders receive free shipping via stacking coupon code “LCSHIP”. Deal ends May 18.